Xanadu

Quantum computing powered by light

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Xanadu Quantum

Recent Insight
  • Quantum Hardware Outlook 2020
    2019 saw Google finally demonstrate quantum supremacy. Competitors such as IBM reminded us that this was just an opening skirmish in what will be a long campaign. In 2020 we will see paths divide as competing companies and technologies face-up to the quantum chasm blocking the way to large scale ... read more
    Source: Fact Based Insight – prepare for tomorrowDecember 16, 2019
  • Quantum Software Outlook 2020
    In 2020 everyone will want to persuade you to join their quantum software camp. Not everyone will come away happy. Huddling round the community fire may be a good way to keep the chills of quantum winter at bay. Making camp Everyone knows how lucrative controlling the software playing field ... read more
    Source: Fact Based Insight – prepare for tomorrowDecember 16, 2019
  • Brexit and the Quantum Landscape
    The arrival of Boris Johnson in Downing Street makes a hard Brexit ending more likely. To understand the impact this will have on the science and innovation landscape and quantum technology in particular, we have to look beyond the immediate disruptions and understand how the thinking of the political right ... read more
    Source: Fact Based Insight – prepare for tomorrowJuly 25, 2019
Latest News
  • Single-mode quadrature squeezing using dual-pump four-wave mixing in an integrated nanophotonic device
    We report the generation of broadband single-mode (degenerate) quadrature squeezed vacuum from an integrated nanophotonic device based on two coupled silicon nitride microring resonators. Dual-pump spontaneous four-wave mixing in one microring resonator is exploited to generate squeezed light, while unwanted single-pump parametric fluorescence and Bragg-scattering four-wave mixing processes are suppressed ... read more
    Source: Xanadu – NewsJanuary 26, 2020
  • Xanadu Receives $4.4M Investment from SDTC to Advance its Photonic Quantum Computing Technology
    The post Xanadu Receives $4.4M Investment from SDTC to Advance its Photonic Quantum Computing Technology appeared first on Xanadu Quantum Technologies. ... read more
    Source: Xanadu – NewsJanuary 17, 2020
  • Optimal modular architectures for universal linear optics
    We present modular and optimal architectures for implementing arbitrary discrete unitary transformations on light. These architectures are based on systematically combining smaller M-mode linear optical interferometers together to implement a larger N-mode transformation. The post Optimal modular architectures for universal linear optics appeared first on Xanadu Quantum Technologies. ... read more
    Source: Xanadu – NewsJanuary 8, 2020
  • Quantum embeddings for machine learning
    Quantum classifiers are trainable quantum circuits used as machine learning models. The first part of the circuit implements a quantum feature map that encodes classical inputs into quantum states, embedding the data in a high-dimensional Hilbert space; the second part of the circuit executes a quantum measurement interpreted as the ... read more
    Source: Xanadu – NewsJanuary 7, 2020
  • Transfer learning in hybrid classical-quantum neural networks
    We extend the concept of transfer learning, widely applied in modern machine learning algorithms, to the emerging context of hybrid neural networks composed of classical and quantum elements. The post Transfer learning in hybrid classical-quantum neural networks appeared first on Xanadu Quantum Technologies. ... read more
    Source: Xanadu – NewsDecember 19, 2019
  • Circumventing defective components in linear optical interferometer
    A crucial challenge to the scaling up of linear optical interferometers is the presence of defective optical components resulting from inevitable imperfections in fabrication and packaging. This work presents a method for circumventing such defective components including lossy modes and unresponsive phase shifters and beam-splitters. The method allows for using ... read more
    Source: Xanadu – NewsDecember 18, 2019
  • Applications of Near-Term Photonic Quantum Computers: Software and Algorithms
    Gaussian Boson Sampling (GBS) is a near-term platform for photonic quantum computing. Recent efforts have led to the discovery of GBS algorithms with applications to graph-based problems, point processes, and molecular vibronic spectra in chemistry. The post Applications of Near-Term Photonic Quantum Computers: Software and Algorithms appeared first on Xanadu ... read more
    Source: Xanadu – NewsDecember 18, 2019
  • External Role: The University of Toronto Department of Physics – Postdoctoral Fellow
    The University of Toronto Department of Physics, in collaboration with Xanadu (www.xanadu.ai), a full-stack quantum computing startup company in Toronto, is initiating a joint research program into frontier projects on continuous variable quantum optics, in particular, the generation and characterization of non-Gaussian and Gaussian states. Within this project there are ... read more
    Source: Xanadu – NewsNovember 29, 2019
  • Xanadu awarded DARPA grant to further advance quantum machine learning
    Xanadu, a full-stack quantum computing and advanced AI company developing quantum hardware and software solutions, has been awarded a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) grant. The post Xanadu awarded DARPA grant to further advance quantum machine learning appeared first on Xanadu Quantum Technologies. ... read more
    Source: Xanadu – NewsNovember 19, 2019
  • Stimulated Four-Wave Mixing in Linearly Uncoupled Resonators
    We experimentally demonstrate stimulated four-wave mixing in two linearly uncoupled integrated Si3N4 micro-resonators. In our structure the resonance combs of each resonator can be tuned independently… The post Stimulated Four-Wave Mixing in Linearly Uncoupled Resonators appeared first on Xanadu Quantum Technologies. ... read more
    Source: Xanadu – NewsOctober 29, 2019
Project Description

Xanadu designs and integrates quantum silicon photonic chips into existing hardware to create truly full-stack quantum computing.

Instead of using electrons to carry information and perform calculations, we use photons. Unlike electrons, photons are very stable and are almost unaffected by random noise from heat. We use photonic chips to generate, control, and measure photons in ways that enable extremely fast computation.

We work with foundries for chip fabrication, leveraging photonics at its cutting edge with lithographically-written photonic integrated circuits.

Laser light powers our quantum processor chips, traveling and interacting through nano-scale channels.

The fundamental resource for computation -- squeezed light -- is generated on chip and used for calculations intractable for conventional chips.

Project Details
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