NIST

National Institute of Standard and Technology

US Department of Commerce

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Post-quantum cryptography

NIST has initiated a process to solicit, evaluate, and standardize one or more quantum-resistant public-key cryptographic algorithms. This project involves collaboration from groups around the world.

Recent Insight
  • Quantum safe cryptography – the big picture
    Recently updated advice on quantum security technologies from the UK NCSC is bluntly sceptical about the promised benefits of quantum key distribution. This seems at odds with the scramble of governments around the world to promote the development of quantum networking technologies. Who is right? Future large scale quantum computers... Read more
  • Quantum Outlook 2020
    2020 will be a watershed year for the Quantum Revolution. There will be surprising early applications, though previously over-hyped timelines may leave some disappointed. Geopolitical considerations will be hard to ignore as major national programmes set out their stalls. The chill winds of a quantum winter may threaten some, but... Read more
  • Quantum Algorithms Outlook 2020
    Contrary to many reports there are set be immediate applications even for early devices. Some will be controversial. However in other areas timelines look over-hyped. 2020 will be a key year to prove the naysayers wrong. Will clients see early value? Despite all the fuss, quantum processors actually run more... Read more
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Project Description

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) was founded in 1901 and is now part of the U.S. Department of Commerce. NIST is one of the nation's oldest physical science laboratories. Congress established the agency to remove a major challenge to U.S. industrial competitiveness at the time—a second-rate measurement infrastructure that lagged behind the capabilities of the United Kingdom, Germany, and other economic rivals.

From the smart electric power grid and electronic health records to atomic clocks, advanced nanomaterials, and computer chips, innumerable products and services rely in some way on technology, measurement, and standards provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Today, NIST measurements support the smallest of technologies to the largest and most complex of human-made creations—from nanoscale devices so tiny that tens of thousands can fit on the end of a single human hair up to earthquake-resistant skyscrapers and global communication networks.

Project Details
  • Institute: NIST
  • Founded: 1901
  • Capabilities: Communications technology, engineering, information technology, material measurement, physical measurement
  • Home: www.nist.gov
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