NIST

National Institute of Standard and Technology

US Department of Commerce

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Post-quantum cryptography

NIST has initiated a process to solicit, evaluate, and standardize one or more quantum-resistant public-key cryptographic algorithms. This project involves collaboration from groups around the world.

Recent Insight
  • Quantum safe cryptography – waiting to save the world
    Future quantum computers will one day bring us many great benefits. Unfortunately they will also break many of the cryptographic protocols on which current Internet security depends. Google’s quantum supremacy breakthrough notwithstanding, this is still most likely many years off. However, sensitive data intercepted and stored today, or long lifecycle ... read more
    Source: Fact Based Insight – prepare for tomorrowOctober 4, 2019
  • Brexit and the Quantum Landscape
    The arrival of Boris Johnson in Downing Street makes a hard Brexit ending more likely. To understand the impact this will have on the science and innovation landscape and quantum technology in particular, we have to look beyond the immediate disruptions and understand how the thinking of the political right ... read more
    Source: Fact Based Insight – prepare for tomorrowJuly 25, 2019
  • Quantum enhanced blockchain – sooner than you think?
    Future quantum computers will ultimately force blockchain solutions to adopt strengthened quantum safe crypto protocols. Rationally there remains plenty of time to act, but proponents need to get their transition stories in place to avoid being caught out as we near peak quantum hype. More positively, the nascent blockchain industry ... read more
    Source: Fact Based Insight – prepare for tomorrowMay 13, 2019
Latest News
  • Stretched Photons Recover Lost Interference
    The smallest pieces of nature—individual particles like electrons, for instance—are pretty much interchangeable. An electron is an electron is an electron, regardless of whether it’s stuck in a lab on Earth, bound to an atom in some chalky moon dust or shot out of an extragalactic black hole in a ... read more
    Source: Joint Quantum Institute – Univ. of Maryland, NIST & LPS – NewsOctober 14, 2019
  • Quantum Materials Symposium to Showcase Local Expertise and Highlight Partnerships in D.C. Region
    The University of Maryland will hold a one-day symposium focusing on local research into quantum materials—condensed matter systems that exhibit strong quantum effects and hold promise as potential components in next-generation computers, sensors and other devices. The symposium will be held Sept. 26, 2019, on campus in the Kim Engineering ... read more
    Source: Joint Quantum Institute – Univ. of Maryland, NIST & LPS – NewsSeptember 25, 2019
  • Monroe named Lamb Medal winner
    Christopher Monroe, a JQI Fellow, Distinguished University Professor, and the Bice Seci-Zorn Professor in the Department of Physics at UMD, has received the 2020 Willis E. Lamb Award for Laser Science and Quantum Optics. ... read more
    Source: Joint Quantum Institute – Univ. of Maryland, NIST & LPS – NewsSeptember 17, 2019
  • JQI welcomes four newest Fellows
    JQI has named four new Fellows in 2019, bringing the total number to 35. All four of the new arrivals have appointments in the Department of Physics at the University of Maryland. One Fellow is also a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UMD and another ... read more
    Source: Joint Quantum Institute – Univ. of Maryland, NIST & LPS – NewsSeptember 10, 2019
  • Ions clear another hurdle toward scaled-up quantum computing
    Scientists at the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) have been steadily improving the performance of ion trap systems, a leading platform for future quantum computers. Now, a team of researchers led by JQI Fellows Norbert Linke and Christopher Monroe has performed a key experiment on five ion-based quantum bits, or qubits. ... read more
    Source: Joint Quantum Institute – Univ. of Maryland, NIST & LPS – NewsAugust 16, 2019
  • Corkscrew photons may leave behind a spontaneous twist
    Everything radiates. Whether it's a car door, a pair of shoes or the cover of a book, anything hotter than absolute zero (i.e., pretty much everything) is constantly shedding radiation in the form of photons, the quantum particles of light. A twin process—absorption—is usually also present. As photons carry away ... read more
    Source: Joint Quantum Institute – Univ. of Maryland, NIST & LPS – NewsAugust 2, 2019
  • Second annual trapped-ion conference comes to UMD
    The University of Maryland will host the 2nd North American Conference on Trapped Ions (NACTI) from July 22-26. This year’s conference comes two years after the inaugural meeting, which was held on the Boulder, Colorado campus of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). More than 230 students and ... read more
    Source: Joint Quantum Institute – Univ. of Maryland, NIST & LPS – NewsJuly 19, 2019
  • Gorshkov receives early-career research award
    Alexey Gorshkov, a JQI Fellow and a Fellow of the Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science, has received a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The honor, which is the most prestigious offered by the United States Government to young researchers, was announced July 2. ... read more
    Source: Joint Quantum Institute – Univ. of Maryland, NIST & LPS – NewsJuly 12, 2019
  • Perfect quantum portal emerges at exotic interface
    Researchers at the University of Maryland have captured the most direct evidence to date of a quantum quirk that allows particles to tunnel through a barrier like it’s not even there. The result, featured on the cover of the June 20, 2019 issue of the journal Nature, may enable engineers ... read more
    Source: Joint Quantum Institute – Univ. of Maryland, NIST & LPS – NewsJune 19, 2019
  • Ring resonators corner light
    Researchers at the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) have created the first silicon chip that can reliably constrain light to its four corners. The effect, which arises from interfering optical pathways, isn't altered by small defects during fabrication and could eventually enable the creation of robust sources of quantum light. ... read more
    Source: Joint Quantum Institute – Univ. of Maryland, NIST & LPS – NewsJune 17, 2019

 

Project Description

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) was founded in 1901 and is now part of the U.S. Department of Commerce. NIST is one of the nation's oldest physical science laboratories. Congress established the agency to remove a major challenge to U.S. industrial competitiveness at the time—a second-rate measurement infrastructure that lagged behind the capabilities of the United Kingdom, Germany, and other economic rivals.

From the smart electric power grid and electronic health records to atomic clocks, advanced nanomaterials, and computer chips, innumerable products and services rely in some way on technology, measurement, and standards provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Today, NIST measurements support the smallest of technologies to the largest and most complex of human-made creations—from nanoscale devices so tiny that tens of thousands can fit on the end of a single human hair up to earthquake-resistant skyscrapers and global communication networks.

Project Details
  • Institute: NIST
  • Founded: 1901
  • Capabilities: Communications technology, engineering, information technology, material measurement, physical measurement
  • Home: www.nist.gov
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